Monument voor slachtoffers vliegtuigcrash OO-CBG, St Martin-in-the-Wood's

Periode: Na WOII tot 1958
Type: Begraafplaats
Militair of Burger: Burger
Status: Niet beschermd
Datum registratie: 
10/01/2015
Datum gebeurtenis: 
18/09/1946
  • © Tom Bergen, 15 juli 2014© Tom Bergen, 15 juli 2014© Tom Bergen, 15 juli 2014
  • © Archief Frans Van Humbeek
Locatie: 
35km ZW van Gander, Newfoundland, Canada

Info Tom Bergen (19 augustus 2014): Het betreft de crashsite van de Sabena DC-4, OO-CBG, neergestort op 18 september 1946 door een combinatie van slecht weer, het gebrek aan standaard procedures voor een ‘instrument approach’ en een voor dat traject onervaren piloot. De overblijfselen van het wrak zijn na de crash niet geborgen geweest. De slachtoffers zijn ter plaatse begraven en ter gelegenheid van de 50ste verjaardag werd er een monument opgericht door 103 Sqn SAR van de RCAF. De site is enkel toegankelijk per helikopter of na een helse trip van meer dan twee uur op een ATV. Zie ook mijn artikel www.hangarflying.eu/nl/content/st-martin%E2%80%99s-woods-een-stille-getu...

 

By Chris Ensing, CBC News Posted: Sep 19, 2016 5:11 PM NT Last Updated: Sep 19, 2016 5:11 PM NT:
 
Streets, wreath dedicated to Sabena DC-4 crash victims and heroes
70th anniversary marks 1st time helicopters used in rescue effort
A member of the 103 Search and Rescue Squadron places a wreath at the Sabena DC-4 crash site to mark the 70th anniversary.
A search and rescue technician was lowered down to the wreckage of a Sabena Airlines DC-4 plane Sunday to place a wreath on the 70-year-old crash site near Gander.
The Belgian ambassador to Canada and vice admiral of the United States Coast Guard were on board the helicopter to mark the anniversary of the deadliest civilian plane crash of its time.
"The moment will always be remembered with a strong feeling of appreciation," said Belgian Ambassador to Canada Raoul Delcorde.
The airplane was flying from Belgium to New York, and intended to land in Gander to refuel. Twenty-six people were killed in the crash and were buried at the site.
Helicopters were brought in to rescue the remaining 18 passengers from the remote area. It was the first time helicopters were used in such a rescue effort.
"It created quite a commotion in my country,"  the ambassador told CBC News, adding that a cabinet minister and a number of teenagers were killed in the crash.
Delcorde said the lives of people like flight attendant Jean Rookx need to be remembered.
"[She] behaved almost like a hero by helping these survivors," he said.
"And I think that she deserved to be mentioned."
 
Vice Admiral Charles Ray, second in command of the United States Coast Guard, said the rescue of the 18 survivors showed innovation, courage and compassion.
"I think this group and this rescue epitomize things we should all hold near and dear to our hearts," Ray said during a ceremony honouring Captain Samuel Martin and Commandor Stewert Graham.
Cpt. Martin was the medical lead of the rescue mission while Cmdr. Graham flew one of the helicopters.
 
CEO of the Gander International Airport Authority Reg Wright presents Vice Admiral Charles Ray of United States Coast Guard with street signs dedicated to a pair of Americans involved in the rescue of 18 passengers during the Sabena DC-4 crash in 1946. (Chris Ensing/CBC)
 
"Helicopter operations as the [103 Search and Rescue Squadron] demonstrates everyday, those are taken for granted," Ray said. "That was a bold new way of aviation in 1946."
The Gander International Airport Authority dedicated two streets at the airport in honour of Cpt. Martin and Cmdr Graham.
"I thank you all for honouring these two great Americans," Ray said during the ceremony.

 

"They represent the best of both our countries through their courage, innovation and compassion."